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Chuck Prophet

Chuck Prophet describes his new disc Bobby Fuller Died For Your Sins as "California Noir." He says, "the state has always represented the Golden Dream, and it's the tension between romance and reality that lurks underneath the surface in all noir films and paperbacks, and that connects these songs." The title track came out of an obsession Prophet shares with co-conspirator klipschutz. Prophet explains, "One day we were sitting in my so-called office South of Market listening to LPs, when out of frustration I picked up a guitar and shouted, 'I hear that record crackle, the needle skips and jumps!' and klipschutz shot back, 'Bobby Fuller died for your sins!'" Who is Bobby Fuller? He's the star of the ultimate Rock and Roll Babylon feel-bad story. Prophet realizes that the title track makes a heavy claim, and laughs at the suggestion that it might shine new light on the mystery long surrounding Fuller's early demise. Fuller, who migrated from El Paso to L.A. in the early 1960s, has been described as "a greaser in a world of Beach Boy bangs and Beatle boots, hopelessly out of step with the times." Found dead in his car at the age of 23, to a devoted coterie of fans, old and new, he'll always remain the skinny guy singing "I Fought the Law" on countless teen dance TV shows and radio playlists. Ruled a suicide, his death has haunted investigators since 1966. "Some resolution would be nice," Prophet says, "but I run a band, not a Cold Case squad." In conjunction with the release of his latest album, the GRAMMY Museum welcomes San Francisco-based singer/songwriter, guitarist and producer, Chuck Prophet, to the Clive Davis Theatre for an intimate conversation on his new music, followed by a special performance. The evening will be hosted by Scott Goldman, Vice President of the GRAMMY Foundation and MusiCares.

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