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Donovan

By 1966, Donovan had evolved beyond his initial folk troubadour style and fully embraced the budding "flower power" movement. Finding inspiration in jazz, blues, world music and West Coast U.S. rock, he partnered with top UK producer Mickie Most and arranger John Cameron to capture the sound he was pursuing in his mind. Their first collaboration, the "Sunshine Superman" single, was a smashing success, reaching No. 1 on the U.S. charts and establishing Donovan as a major pop star. Today, Donovan is widely regarded as one of the most influential songwriters and recording artists. During his induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2012, it was stated that he, "singlehandedly initiated the Psychedelic Revolution with his album Sunshine Superman," which is said to have influenced The Beatles' 1967 opus Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. The album is considered a classic masterpiece featuring hits including "Sunshine Superman," "Mellow Yellow," "The Hurdy Gurdy Man," "Jenifer Juniper," and "Season of the Witch." To celebrate the 50th anniversary of his landmark 1966 album, Donovan launched a North American tour on Sept. 4 featuring sold-out shows in New York, San Francisco, Seattle, and Toronto. In addition, this year the city of Los Angeles officially declared Sept. 3 as Donovan Day, marking the actual to-the-date 50-year anniversary of when Donovan's hit single "Sunshine Superman" reached No. 1 on the Billboard charts. The GRAMMY Museum welcomes Donovan to the Clive Davis Theater for an intimate discussion on his classic album and performance, hosted by Scott Goldman, Vice President of the GRAMMY Foundation and MusiCares.